‘Anakē Lynette Kahekili Kaopuiki Paglinawan: Following in the Steps of Her Ancestors

  • Michael DeMattos University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Keywords: Social Work, Indigeous Social Work, Native Hawaiian Healing, Culturally Relevant Practice, Faith and Practice

Abstract

‘Anakē Lynette Kahekili Kaopuiki Paglinawan is a social worker, woman of faith, and Native Hawaiian cultural practitioner. She has a long history of working with Native Hawaiian families and was one of the first social workers to integrate culturally-based interventions into her social work practice in the mid-sixties. ‘Anakē Lynette remains active in the community working with individuals, families, and various organizations. She is currently a faculty member at the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa where she directs the Hawaiian Learning Program and serves as cultural consultant for numerous school initiatives. In 2012 ‘Anakē Lynette was recognized as a Living Treasure by the Hongpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawai‘i. Taken together, the stories in this article paint a picture of an Indigenous healer firmly anchored in her identity and comfortable in the multiple worlds that Indigenous Peoples must traverse on a daily basis.

Author Biography

Michael DeMattos, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Michael C. DeMattos has been working in the helping profession for nearly thirty years.  He is currently Chair of the BSW Program at the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.  In 2008, he received the coveted Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.  Michael is committed to extending educational access to underrepresented populations, Indigenous ways of knowing, and culturally relevant practice.

 

Published
2016-05-24