INDIVIDUAL OBLIGATION AND THE LAW An Essay on "Do the Right Thing".

  • Samuel A. Richmond Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, Cleveland State University Cleveland OH

Abstract

Respect for law arises out of our respect for each other Laws that foster and protect our humanity are worthy of our respect and win our loyalty and obedience. But even when law fails to win in the court of my conscience I respect it if it wins support from the consciences of other persons. For there are times when I wish them to obey a law my conscience supports even though their conscience may view it as unnecessarily burdensome. Hence, whether this law would be supported by other members of the profession and the community at large is relevant to whether it deserves Houston's obedience The Social Work Profession is perhaps unique in that it advocates for those not well served by the law; and we rely on its members to protect our humanity and personality in the dark place of the law. This essay's brief survey of theoretical perspectives on the nature of law and individual obligation suggests that one ought not to take law at face value, but to examine the structure of its actual political, economic and social context. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Copyright of Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping is the property of Cleveland State University and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Published
2014-06-13
Section
General Submissions